Central Ohio Tax Defense Lawyer

We Focus on Your Tax Problems, So You can Focus on Your Business

Contact
  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Firm News
  4.  » Confusion Regarding IRS Notices With Expired Action Dates

Confusion Regarding IRS Notices With Expired Action Dates

| Aug 3, 2020 | Firm News

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is reopening its operations following its shutdown in March due to the COVID-19 emergency.

The IRS generated more than 20 million notices during the shutdown, but the mailing of these notices has only recently begun.  As a result, the notices contain action dates or response deadlines that have already passed. The good news is that the IRS is providing additional time to respond before interest or penalties apply.

To save Taxpayers money, the IRS is not revising the generated notices.  Instead, they are enclosing an insert with the mailings with updated due-date information.  If you receive a notice from the IRS, it is crucial that you review the entire package and reference the insert to determine the revised due date.

In some situations, the IRS notice proposes an increase in tax for a simple mathematical or clerical error.  These mailings will include a notice stating that you have 60 days after the notice is sent to contact the IRS to request a reversal. If you do not timely request a reversal, the tax is assessed and you lose the opportunity to appeal in U.S. Tax Court, which is your only opportunity to challenge the liability in court before paying it.

For other notices in the backlog that provide a deadline for action, IRS will provide a revised deadline to request a hearing that is 30 days after the IRS mails out the notice.

In addition to reading the insert, you can check the IRS website for updates, or via alternative channels, such as social media and other outreach.  Also, be sure to check our website for further IRS announcements.  Willi Law Office, LLC has been providing personalized legal services to individuals and businesses in Westerville and Central Ohio for over 20 years.

Bottom Line: Look for and Read the Insert for Applicable Due Dates